Listen up!

26 Nov

We demand it, we ask for it, we give it, and we get it. At least we hope so. But respect is extremely important when thinking about how we use the Common Core in order to engage our students in close readings, discussions, and Accountable Talks.

Respect is shown when we look at someone who is talking, when we recognize what was said, and we do not repeat each other because we weren’t paying attention. Simple listening skills that we all expect our students to utilize. Yes, I would love to have students doing this while I speak, but I also know that it is a must for when students are speaking to each other. 

Now the question is: how do we teach this? I’ve seen videos like this one from the Teaching Channel that show students listening, reacting, interacting, and commenting appropriately when other students speak. And those are just fourth graders! I want that! Actually, I need that in my classroom.

Is this something that comes from having the same expectations across a team or grade level? Instead, we set different rules and expectations, or worse yet, simply lament the fact that our students do not seem to care about what their body language says to their speaking peers.

As I was reading Kim Campbell’s book If You Can’t Manage Them, You Can’t Teach Them, she talked about respect and the role that it plays in teachers’ sets of rules.

One of my expectations is that we respect each other… After several years of this approach, I realized I was operating under the (faulty) assumption that students understood exactly what I meant. Teachers continually demand respect. But students do not always know exactly what it means or what it looks like in a classroom.

Uh oh. That sounds an awful lot like me. I am very conscious to avoid long rules lists on the first day of school. The word respect encompasses everything that I want to see in my classroom. But the meaning of the word respect varies greatly among my students. That is what needs to change. We need to know what respect looks like in my classroom because that can have the same meaning for everyone.

Screen Shot 2013-11-26 at 1.51.40 PM

One thing I am trying is the use of the hand signals that you see to the right. I recently added the “I agree with you” signal to encourage active listening as well. This gives the listeners a reminder that it isn’t just about the person speaking. It also asks the listeners to think about what they plan to say ahead of time and see where that fits in with what is currently being said.

As teachers, we can spend our time complaining about the poor manners, listening skills, and peer interactions, or we can start teaching students what to do instead. I’m in, now I just need to know where to start!

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