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Google Presentation – So what am I going to do with it?

1 Jul

For a long time I have told myself that I need to get better at creating visual presentations. That I need to stop relying too heavily on my students’ listening skills and not properly supporting them. And that it is just more fun to have images to go along with what I’m saying.

I think I was probably a little afraid to be bad at presentations, and probably slightly overwhelmed. I have used a few SlideRocket presentations that were simple and interactive, but it wasn’t often enough. I just didn’t want to put up slides of words and read them to my kids – ever.

A session from the ND GAFE Summit immediately caught my eye – Breathe Fresh Life into Google Presentations with Mark Hammons. Yes, please! So let’s take a look at the ways this presentation on presentations is going to be my biggest change for 2014-15.

One of the goals was to use 40 words of less in a presentation. If we focus on using pictures, that will allow the presenter to tell a story, and that story has the power to resonate with the audience. We even got to swear like a Boy Scout, “I vow to tell a story and not teach what can be read.” If the audience can read it, why am I there?

If you do have a slide that must have words, that can be done in a creative way with a word cloud. This will avoid the reading of bullet points that does not accomplish anything, and keep the presentation moving in the right direction.

But let’s get back to pictures. We learned all sorts of tricks with color matching and photo editing that are going to make my presentations awesome. I’ll do my best to share them! It might help to take a look at the Presentation Playground that Mark had us use. That is my copy, so you can see the few slides that I created by following the directions, but feel free to make your own copy and practice!

Here’s the first example from Google Presentations:

Screen Shot 2014-07-01 at 9.49.15 AMScreen Shot 2014-07-01 at 9.49.28 AM

We used the research tool that is found under the “Tools” menu. Amazing. By searching for a famous person, you will get quotes, pictures, and links to websites that make creating a slide a piece of cake! Just click on “insert” and make it look great. We used a Chrome Screen Shot 2014-07-01 at 11.01.41 AMExtension for that called ColorPick Eyedropper. This allows you to find the color hex number (an ID of sorts) that you can use to customize your background to match a picture (and much, much more).

Example #2:

Screen Shot 2014-07-01 at 10.01.46 AMScreen Shot 2014-07-01 at 10.01.57 AMThe power of pictures was something that stood out to me during this session. When a quality picture takes over an entire screen, it is an eye-opening experience. So we resized this image of Mark’s son pretending to throw up in order to fill up the entire screen. We can then insert a text box over that to get our couple of words in.

Screen Shot 2014-07-01 at 10.16.39 AMTo make the text box a transparent color, click on the “Fill color” icon, go down to “Custom” on the bottom, choose your color, and adjust the transparency bar (the farthest to the right) to the level that works best. This will help your viewers to focus on the words as well as the great picture.

Example #3 – For some reason the most mind-blowing at the time:

Screen Shot 2014-07-01 at 10.20.51 AMScreen Shot 2014-07-01 at 10.21.06 AMThe ColorPick Eyedropper was great, but what do you do when you’re stuck with a picture that is straight up and down, but the background color is different from top to bottom?

Mark took a screenshot of the tiny sliver on the right side, being careful not to catch the finger at all. We then, following his example, inserted that screenshot into the presentation, resized it to fit from top to bottom, and stretched it all the way across the slide. Now we have a gray screen that is very similar in color to the background of the picture. So easy, but so cool!

Example #4:

Screen Shot 2014-07-01 at 10.27.03 AMWe used the Eyedropper again, this time go grab the color from this great picture. Copy the hex number, change the color of your text to a custom color, and paste the number in the box on the top! Such a simple way to connect your text colors to your photographs.

And example #5 sums it all up:

Screen Shot 2014-07-01 at 10.38.54 AMPresentations can be incredibly engaging – as long as we do them right! The most important thing to remember is that slides should help your audience connect with what you are saying. Make them funny. Make them personal. And make them great!

We can also begin to think of the power we can give our students to create when we teach them how to be confident and engaging presenters. These tools go beyond just the creation of an all-encompassing PowerPoint and require our students to deeply know the content of their presentation.

And if you want to dig a little deeper into the power of presentations with Nancy Duarte, check out this TED Talk.

Google tricks to make life easier

24 Jun

Google really does it right. Last weekend’s Google Apps For Education (GAFE) Summit in Grand Forks was energizing, engaging, and full of learning experiences. After a session was finished, I found myself staying in my seat in an attempt to absorb as much what we had just done and learned. Is that normal? The good news is that we had 30 minutes between sessions that provided time for collaboration, questions, and recovery. Brain sweat is fun!

Some of the most exciting things to me were the little things. The things that I might use every day or every week in the classroom to make life a little easier. I’ll let you in on a few of those things today!

I use my computer all the time to show students all sorts of things. When our presenters asked us to follow along, they made it easy by zooming in as well as highlighting the mouse. Both tricks were highly effective. The first one is to highlight the mouse. I spent the $4.99 on the Mouseposé app in the Apple App Store without regret!

MouseSo now when I want my students to see where I am navigating, I press F1 and highlight my cursor. Brilliant!

Another often-used trick was zooming on a Mac. Whenever a presenter wanted to help us focus in on something, give us a web address, or anything else that did not require the full screen, he quickly scrolled up and zoomed in on that area. I know it’s a small thing, but I was impressed! I can imagine using this daily.

Here is how you set it up for your Mac. Go under Universal Access in the System Preferences. Turn the zoom on, go to Options, and check “Use scroll wheel with modifier keys to zoom.” I think it is set to be the control key, so now when I hold down control and scroll up with two fingers, my screen zooms in. These little things will help keep the focus on where it needs to be during any sort of presentation.

My students constantly point out the extreme amount of tabs that I have open in Google Chrome. Here are a few tricks that deal with tabs:

One Tab is an extension found in the Chrome Web Store that takes each of your tabs and condenses them down into one tab. That tab can then be shared as a link with students or saved for later. It saves on memory and reduces clutter!

Tab Scissors is another extension that divides up your tabs into a split-screen look allowing you to type on one side while viewing another page at the same time.

Tab Glue, you guessed it, puts the tabs back together!

Screen Shot 2014-06-24 at 9.36.21 AM

And a few other tricks that everyone already has if you right click on a tab – ctrl+click or two-finger click with a Mac:

You can pin the tab to your task bar, and that will remove the X that would close it.

You can also close all other tabs.

Or close all tabs to the right of the one that you clicked on.

And lastly, you can reopen your last closed tab with this click or ctrl+shift+t.

I know this is going to make my life easier. I hope it does the same for you!