Tag Archives: creativity

When we need to recharge

10 Nov

What happens when you hit a rut? In the 180 plus days of school, it is bound to happen. The mid-semester innovations slump seems to be upon us here in the basement. We have had a few failures, a few successes, but now it is time to take what we have learned and do something amazing.

As I sit and listen to an unusually quite room here in innovations class, it is clear that my pre-blogging speech inspired some reflection today. So what do we do when we need to be inspired?

Reexamine your passions

Why are we even here? What are we good at? How can I align those passions and skills with a problem that lies ahead? On Monday for our brainstorm activity, we made a list of our passions and skills. We then narrowed them down by grouping them together in order to find “the sweet spot” where our passions intersect. We then made a list of problems we have seen around us. How can our passions and skills help to solve those problems?

Take a look at the video below to see what we did at the start of the week.

The next step is for those who were unable to determine a problem they cared about in that session. The assignment over the weekend will be to start a “Bug List” in the notes app of their phone.

Put yourself and your beliefs out there

When we are challenged, we have to determine whether we will stand behind our beliefs or want to disregard them. Blogs help us do to this. My most important example came from innovations class last year. She and I each tweeted her blog post about sexual assault and a discussion with a teacher. The responses she got were rude, offensive, and ignorant. She came to class and asked, “What should I do? Should I take it down?” What we learned was that when trying to make a change, we often run into resistance. This is the time when we determine how strong our beliefs are. That resistance meant that she hit a nerve and needed to keep going. After seeing that response, the student had a renewed commitment to her project and her ultimate goal of educating her fellow students on sexual assault and rape culture. If our beliefs go unchallenged, it can be difficult to find the dedication and determination to make something happen.

Collaborate with trusted peers

When we work with others whom we respect, we have an opportunity to grow our thinking. Even more important is the energy that comes from a great sharing session with a group. We have a chance to be that source of energy for others each day. Think about the last time you met to talk about a great idea, great book, or great speaker. When we have something to discuss that truly matters to us, it is energizing to share that sense of community and build ideas together. Be an energy creator, not an energy vampire!

My hope is that our innovations class continues to see the potential in their ideas and the world around them. Looking back at these three ideas, I find that I use them in my professional life, and that is what makes innovations class so important. If these students can build these skills in high school, they will be far ahead of their peers as they head on to their next steps in life.

Knowing and addressing this slump is an important step on our road to big successes.

 

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Video

PBL, what a way to end the year!

28 Sep

So my English class is not exactly traditional. The “rules” about what to teach and how just don’t seem to prepare students for their future. That’s why instead of writing a final paper at the end of junior year, my students participated in a project-based learning experience. It was the best end to a school year that I have ever been a part of.

Here’s a quote about the project that I’ll never forget, “We’re actually, like, doing stuff in this class. That’s so weird for the end of the year. Usually we don’t do a whole lot.” And let me tell you, that is pretty enthusiastic approval from a junior! So project-based learning will make a return to junior English this year, that’s for sure.

Schools tend to breed question answerers. We want students to be able to recall information and use it to display their knowledge. This is no longer enough in our world where information is so readily available to those who wish to find it. It is the thinking that matters.

The next step is to help students to become problem solvers. Apply available knowledge to solve a problem. But even that is lacking something. We need to train students to look for problems and find them if we want to help students become independent thinkers and have the chance to innovative.

Enter project-based learning.

First of all every project needs to have a driving question, one that asks students to truly solve a problem. Here was ours:

How can we, as a PR firm, positively influence the perception of Red River High School?

Students have to evaluate and discover where the problems with perception lie in our own student body as well as in the public. Are these perceptions related to RRHS or to students/teenagers in general? Should effort be focused to influence our own student body or the community?

The students ranked their preferred roles and were assigned one of the following:

  • Presentation coordinator – Leader of presentations, creating slideshow, notes/script, gathering information from other team members and generating one document, coordinate a schedule
  • Video coordinator/Field coordinator – Script writing, film director, set up, planning and execution of strategy
  • Communications coordinator – Publish work , promote positive public image, contacting resources and individuals in the community, gathering resources

The groups then proposed and carried out their project ideas. We had greeters at our doors in the morning (and one day even the band was playing), we had random acts of car washes (students would find their previously dirty car now sparkling in the parking lot), and we had Cuts for Mutts (mowing a lawn after receiving pledges for donations to the humane society). We had a music club with students with special needs and musical performers, an ELL pen pals group, interactions with elementary school classrooms, a book drive, a revamped system to nominate classmates for positive actions, and many more.

But the part that really added incentive to the project was that each group would present their accomplishments as well as the impact that it had to a panel of judges. Our principal, associate principal, a technology partner, our activities director, and our school district’s communications director each generously gave up their time to choose a winner from each class.

Because of this final presentation, students had to learn how to give an effective presentation that did not involve mindlessly reading bullets in a slideshow. They had to truly engage with their audience. And that’s just the presentation part. While carrying out the project, students had to engage with members of the community or school administration in order to carry out their plan and change perceptions. If you want to take a look at one period’s collection presentations, here is the link. What you’ll find is that students actually had to present, a skill that is sometime lost when creating presentations.

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What many groups began to discover was that they wanted to build community in our school, then the public would see more positive students. Instead of just being given a problem, these students had to determine what they actually wanted to address then formulate a plan to make a difference. Some might say that isn’t really “English,” but I’d argue that these skills are the skills these students need in their future. And that’s better.

Just shut up already

9 Sep

Sometimes as a teacher I think I have to keep guiding, pushing, and leading my students. Let’s do this. Let’s talk about this. Here’s what you need to know.

In my innovations class everything is so new. We have to break some of the traditional rules of school, rules that students have followed for up to eleven years. Much of our success depends on how quickly we can get past those, get into something new, and create and design experiences.

Funny that I tried to teach them to break the rules by following those same rules myself.

Yes, there are things they need to know. Yes, we have to have the basics. But when I finally made myself just shut up and let the students go, it was the most energizing class we have had so far.

Here’s where we started this year. We did a brainstorm on day one of what we care about – passions, interests, what gets you up in the morning. Those tend to be big ideas, but when we dig deeper we can narrow those down. A number of students took some of those ideas and found inspiration for their first project.

To start week two we did a gripe/dream session. You complain to your partner who takes notes on everything the griper/dreamer says. When that is done, the recorder asks probing questions to see where the two of them can come up with potential project ideas. A note on this is that it is tough for students to get past the initial complaints, but that is what I have to teach.

That’s when I finally got out of the way. My last piece of advice about choosing projects was to make sure they chose something small enough to not overwhelm themselves. What happened? Exactly what was supposed to happen.

Groups came up with great ideas. Visiting an elderly-care home and interviewing residents about their experiences. Making dog beds and treats for our animal shelter. Blogging using art and film inspired by and for domestic abuse. Learning how to edit videos and create something using GoPro. Cooking those cool Facebook videos and reviewing them.

Will they all be huge successes? Who knows? But the key is that we are starting. And once we start, we can learn. Fail or succeed, we are going to start, reflect, and grow. That is the only that we can move towards innovation!

 

Pass the genius on

5 Feb

My innovations students love sharing what we are doing. This is one of the ways I have been able to see success in our innovations class, through the excitement that my students have developed about doing something. It is clear that their confidence has far surpassed where they thought it would be at this point. We visited with one elementary class, and after the visit everyone asked if we could find another class to go to. Now it’s my turn to share what happened!

For our second class visit, one Mrs. Freund, a second grade teacher, invited us in to help her begin genius hour. I sent her a few ideas that I’ve collected from other elementary teachers.

I would think that 2nd grade projects should only take 1-3 weeks at the start of the process. It is best to start small. Learn something, share it, move on to the next thing. Build their confidence in the process of learning and directing themselves.

Here is one interesting blog post about 2nd grade genius hour.

Here is an email from @BetseyMcIntyre, whose class we visited a few weeks ago:

“Okay, I started by showing some sort of short video every day for about a week to try to get them thinking. A couple examples are the Ted Talk Richard Turere: My invention that made peace with lions and Alex’s Lemonade Stand Foundation Documentary. After that, I introduced Genius Hour with a PowerPoint Tiffany Mannasau shared with me. Then we brainstormed. They had post-its and I had 4 categories on my bulletin board: learn to do, learn to change, learn about, learn to make.We spent a good amount of time brainstorming. We use that board now when we are ready to start a new project.”

Week two – our first visit

Five students from our class went to visit the classroom. We discussed everything that we thought was important and that the students wished they knew as they began their projects – coming up with ideas, current projects, biggest successes, biggest failures, and what we learned through them all. The hope is that the 2nd graders can see the possibilities and be inspired to do something awesome.

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Week three – now what?

After our initial visit, I heard from Mrs. Freund about how genius hour week three went. Kids had started planning and researching with their partners. She is already seeing some of the difficulties that come with genius hour – it isn’t that easy! We are asking students to start breaking the rules of school, and that is a little strange.

A few students want to make a poster to get people to stop smoking. One group wants to find out if the Sasquatch is real. And while interest is a big part of genius hour, these ideas just aren’t good enough. But how do we push students to go beyond the easy and the obvious?

My advice for the smoking poster group: your first idea is usually not your best idea. We train our students, whether implicitly or explicitly, to go with that first conventional and safe idea. Genius hour is to encourage students to try new things and maybe even fail. We don’t fail by doing what we’ve always done or what everyone else is doing. Here are a few ideas to prove that point:

  1. Tell students to line up in birthday order without talking. The best part of this one is to hear the initial complaints even though they aren’t supposed to be speaking. Eventually one students will start doing something, usually hand signals for months. They will get in an order then figure out days from there, and they’ll be mostly accurate. But the key to this is the conversation afterwards. “Why did you go with that strategy?” The answer is always, “Because it was our best idea.” Was it? Or was it the only idea? So often we just go with the first idea because it seems like the easiest or best, but we don’t spend the time to explore other options. Students could have written their birthdays on a scrap of paper, taken out their driver’s licenses, created a timeline on the floor and found their correct spots. What about singing? I said no talking. Break the rules! (taken from inGenius by Tina Seelig)
  2. Come up with a list of 20 ways to share your project or findings. How can you get students to move beyond the initial set of ideas, past the better set, and into the deeper stuff that is actually innovative?
  3. Ask questions. Ask enough to help students realize the potential their idea has and that a poster just isn’t good enough to realize that potential.

For the Sasquatch group whose topic doesn’t seem to offer much depth, ask questions, encourage, let them find out if their project has no legs. The excitement for learning is an important part of genius hour, and we don’t want to squash it. But we do have to help students realize the importance of a powerful question. Help this group discover what really interests them about the Sasquatch. Maybe they research for a day, present to the class, and move on. Maybe they find something that fascinates them in terms of conspiracies that they can learn about. They will hopefully figure out what makes a good project. This is where sharing with our classmates can be effective. What questions are groups asking in order to be successful? Understanding what makes a good project is an important skill to learn at any age.

These classroom visits have beneficial to the elementary students, of course, but so have mine. I’ve learned, and so have the elementary teachers. Genius hour is a great movement when we have dedicated teachers who are planning what is best for our students. It’s a pleasure for my students and I to be a part of the process!

Stop being safe, and start failing

20 Nov

Book drives, winter clothing drives, and canned food drives.

This was not what I had planned when I ventured into my Vague Friday Projects/Genius Hour. But you know what? I just jumped in. Am I failing? Yes, I’d say that I am.

Hey, at least I’m modeling failure for my students!

If I want to see innovation, creativity, and genius in my Genius Hour, I need to start getting kids to question what school is supposed to look and feel like. After one quarter, it’s time to do some reflecting, changing, and flipping upside down. Here’s what I wish I knew at the start of this process, and what I will work to change for my classes now:

Break the rules. Innovation is all about getting people out of their comfort zone. We have to get past the first wave of ideas, past the second wave of ideas, and get to something that is truly innovative. Book drives happen because students think, “I know this will work.” It is my responsibility to open their minds and keep going when the easy and safe answer is staring at them. Innovators do not follow rules. Know the rules so that you can break the rules.

Start with something small. Ideas are hard. If we are going to work on something for one hour on Fridays only, it is tough to expect all students to be ready with their idea in a short amount of time. Students should choose something that they are interested in, write a proposal for the length of the project, the amount of points it will be worth, and what they will accomplish. This will give them practice with the process and experience finding something that they care about. This first project should last three weeks or less.

Keep the groups small or work individually. So much of this type of project depends on students being passionate about learning something. If you get to the point where a group is choosing to do something because it sounds the easiest, it’s time to do some reflecting. Trust me. Some students may want to learn a certain skill, some may want to research a current event, and some may want to invent a new product. Just make sure that each student is following what he or she wants to do.

My next step is to break down the rules that I inadvertently created and start to encourage risk taking. I will use my failure and the reflection that I have done as a model for my students. We’re all in this together, and we don’t learn anything new without failing along the way!

Innovations Class

4 Nov

This year, for the first time in my English classes, we started using Fridays for 20% Time or Genius Hour. It actually started with an idea that a colleague and I joked was called my Vague Friday Project because I wasn’t sure exactly where it was going. This type of thinking initially came from Tony Wagner’s Creating Innovators. This is such a great collection of various outlier teachers who put students in charge of their own real-life learning.

I was inspired to do that in my own room. It’s possible that being in the basement of my new school helped encourage that outlier attitude.

So I’ve been doing a little reading. Pure Genius: Building a Culture of Innovation and Taking 20% Time to the Next Level by Don Wettrick (@donwettrick) is a book that you MUST check out if you’re considering anything that has to do with teaching innovation. I found out that I’m definitely not the only one who is finding their way through the exciting and unpredictable world of Genius Hour.

I immediately became excited about the possibility of creating a new class at my high school. It is called Innovations Class and falls under our state board’s classification of Applied Communications. Thanks to Don Wettrick, I have a plan and a passion for creating this new learning experience for my students.

Here is how it works:
Students choose a problem that needs to be solved. They decide if they are going to work on that alone or in a group of up to three students. They propose a plan, their timeline, the point value of the project, and at least three CCSS English standards that they will master through this project.

Here is the basic class structure:

  • Brainstorming sessions every Monday – but not just the average ones, more directed and unique ways of brainstorming that come from inGenius: A Crash Course in Creativity by Tina Seelig and Creative Confidence: Unleashing the Creative Potential Within Us All by Tom Kelly and David Kelly.
  • Working on projects Tuesday through Thursday – students choose a mentor (that isn’t the teacher) and meet or talk with that person for guidance. Students research their topic, carry out their plans, and build their proposals and presentations, and basically get the job done.
  • Blog/Vlog on Friday – reflecting on how their project is going, their struggles and successes, etc. This is a key to the innovation process.

When the project is finished, the students:
Present their project to their chosen stakeholders.
Argue for their grade and what they believe they have earned.
Choose another project to begin, create a proposal, and start innovating and creating.

One of the biggest parts of this is that we are preparing students for success in the real world. It should never be possible to hear someone question whether or not they will use this in real life. The mentor aspect opens the doors to students who would not normally meet someone in our community, state, or world with connections. Now our students will have someone that they know in the world, and that might become valuable down the road. Might? Okay, it will be.

How do you grade it?
Students determine their approximate point value for the project in their proposal. When they are finished, they will assess themselves and support their case. Talk about students being advocates for themselves! Blogs or Vlogs that are done on a weekly basis will be assessed for reflection.

“When you treat yourself like a professional, other people will do the same.” – Don Wettrick

This class is all about students becoming professionals, and I’m excited to be a part of it.

Essentially speaking

7 Oct

Wow, time sure does go by fast! Apparently I’m already a month into this whole high school thing. At least that’s what they tell me.

Recently we had a chance, as English teachers, to examine all of the secondary English curriculum maps. One thing stood out, well I guess we better say that two things stood out. The first point was that English teachers are protective. Don’t you dare take my books to that grade level! Just kidding (sort of).

But the main point, at least in my eyes, was that an essential question framing a unit makes a huge difference in how that unit is perceived. I have written about Jeffrey Wilhelm before, but his views on essential questions are starting to spread throughout English teachers in our district because of our work last week.

Essential questions must:

  • Get to the heart of the discipline
  • Be compelling and “sexy” in order to capture the students’ attention
  • Not be able to be answered by Googling it

As part of the seventh grade team of teachers who worked on creating essential questions last year, I was proud to hear the chatter of those great questions. Although using the word “sexy” when describing an English lesson might sound ridiculous to some (we almost had to use earmuffs at one point), it is true! How can we be edgy enough to motivate our students to learn?

Here are the unit titles or essential questions that we came up with:

  • How much control do I have over who I am?
  • What would I give up to be free?
  • How can I get people to do what I want?
  • How can I be a hero?

All important to students’ lives, unanswerable through a Google search, and lead students to important parts of English.

New to the tenth and eleventh grade curriculums (curricula? Apparently they are both correct. Thank you, dictionary.com.), I am trying to create some essential questions that are even more powerful and important to my students’ lives. Here is what I have for quarter one.

In American Lit, my first unit is shaped around the question “What power does a label have over me?” We have looked at labels through multiple This I Believe essays dealing with labels. This week we read about the controversy about yoga pants in a local North Dakota school and how the students were shown a clip of Pretty Woman – some pretty interesting labels were being applied to both males and females there – and a blogger’s response to the dress code. And we are moving towards The Scarlet Letter, one of the most famous labels of all. Supporting that will be a look at a girl named Jada who was raped, photographed, and became a hashtag joke on Twitter. Rather than hide in shame Jada stood up for herself and many others and gained national support. Talk about taking over a label!

Creating a unit like this is fun to teach! When I want to be a student in my classroom, and I get fired up about making a connection from a supporting text to a larger piece, it tells me that something great is going to come of it. It also gives me focus in looking for nonfiction articles to support the larger texts.

The hardest part of essential questions is coming up with them! What matters to students right now? What do you know will get their attention?

Challenge yourself to be more engaging in your themes and units. Your student engagement will show you that it was worth it.