Tag Archives: student blogging

Innovations

16 Oct

Here I am asking my students in my innovations class to blog every week, and I’m just walking around visiting about their blogs, talking to them, and, most importantly, not blogging myself. Embarrassing.

Here is what innovations class is all about. First, let me give most, if not all, credit to Don Wettrick for the ideas to make it happen. The basics of the class are we propose a project along with a due date, plan of action, and other necessary information; we carry out a project in our school, community, or worldwide; then we reflect on the project.

I’ll highlight a few projects going on right now, but feel free to take a look at my students’ blogs to hear what they are all about. You can also see our project overviews here.

Seth and Kelly’s project is “ASL in our schools.” They have started a snapchat and they send out daily videos or pictures of signs for their followers to learn. The first day’s snap was a video of “please” and “thank you,” a pretty basic place to start. When I was home after school talking with my wife and mother-in-law about babies signing, I was asked, “What is the sign for please?” I had an answer!

The ASL in school’s project is an example of two students who learned all sorts of things about a topic that mattered to them. Seth and Kelly both had experiences where they felt unprepared to deal with a person who could not hear. They wanted to fix that for themselves and others. And the best part is that they started doing something about it.

One group is helping to put a stop to rape culture by creating a video featuring students that talks about what is right. Their goal is for this video to be shown in health class as part of a discussion on some of the problems in our society that lead to sexual assaults. These three girls have been learning by reading Missoula, by John Krakauer, which is an absolutely fascinating book. They’re passionate about the topic, and passionate about making our world a better place.

These projects are not coming without obstacles. Students have been told “no,” have ran into dead ends, and have gone days without hearing back from possible mentors. My hope is that this class teaches my students perseverance. My secondary hope is that my students also learn when to give up and move on. It does no good to sit around and wait for a response from someone for a week before acting on an idea. If the idea matters enough, make something happen.

I was asked today in class about how we would present what we have done and learned. I told the class that we would be giving a TED Talk, similar to the ones we watch each week. “Do you mean like a TED-style talk in class or a like on stage?” Now we’re talking! Yes, on stage in the theatre or performance hall! And we can invite everyone! That’s when the panicked looks replaced the friendly smiles. But this class is all about getting us out of our comfort zone! Anyone want to come watch?

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It doesn’t have to be Genius Hour

6 Mar

Genius Hour, what isn’t there to love? And it is easy to see why – learning becomes a joyful experience that is owned by each student. Our classes become authentic environments where students choose what to learn. Of course this sounds great!

But I’m slightly afraid.

I love the idea of inspiring kids to learn by giving them ownership over the topic. I have been experimenting with Genius Hour/20% Time/Innovation Hour in my junior English classes this year, and let’s just say that I’ve learned a lot.

What happens if we ruin it?

My biggest fear is that I’ll have a group of juniors walk in to my room and moan because, “We did this last year,” or, “I never know what to do,” or, “This is boring,” – all sure signs that we ruined it. But it is so important that we do not destroy this experience.

In order to do my part in avoiding ruining Genius Hour, I decided to do something different with my sophomore English classes, something with a little more structure. We created magazines in small groups in order to address real-world writing purposes. It has been a great experience and has helped my students develop a sense of the audience they are writing for.

We still had the most important element in a project like this – student choice.

We created a magazine for each of the first two quarters, and there was some great work! But now it is time to switch things up. Students are going to create a blog or a video blog/YouTube channel on the topic of their choice. The goal is to build a following and create their own brand.

Our first brainstorming session had a great buzz. Students were coming up with great ideas, thinking deeper about those ideas and their potential audiences, and coming up with even better ideas. Some student were working together, and some were working in a group of up to three. There were even a few people who are going to do their own thing but be in the videos of another group.

One key that we discussed in the brainstorming process is that usually our first idea is not our best idea. If I were to sum up my inspirational speech of that day, I think it would sound something like, Get past that first idea, take it out of the mix. What else do you have? Keep building on something unique. Find you niche. What can you offer that others cannot? 

The highlights of my day were the few interactions that went just like this one:

Student: Mr. Sanders, this (a makeup blog) is actually what I want to do for my career.

Me: Yes, this is the start of your career! In a year you will be able to point to your blog and say that you have been doing this for a long time.

And the young man who wants to be a baseball scout will be able to point to his portfolio and show off how much experience he has.

There are groups doing fashion advice and makeup advice and spoofs on makeup advice with guys who are clueless. Food, hockey, tattoos and more.

Give students some choice and see the excitement build. Instead of prodding students to get going, you’ll answering the question, “Can we get started right now?!” Trust me, that’s slightly more fun.

It isn’t Genius Hour, but it sure feels genius to me!

Innovations Class

4 Nov

This year, for the first time in my English classes, we started using Fridays for 20% Time or Genius Hour. It actually started with an idea that a colleague and I joked was called my Vague Friday Project because I wasn’t sure exactly where it was going. This type of thinking initially came from Tony Wagner’s Creating Innovators. This is such a great collection of various outlier teachers who put students in charge of their own real-life learning.

I was inspired to do that in my own room. It’s possible that being in the basement of my new school helped encourage that outlier attitude.

So I’ve been doing a little reading. Pure Genius: Building a Culture of Innovation and Taking 20% Time to the Next Level by Don Wettrick (@donwettrick) is a book that you MUST check out if you’re considering anything that has to do with teaching innovation. I found out that I’m definitely not the only one who is finding their way through the exciting and unpredictable world of Genius Hour.

I immediately became excited about the possibility of creating a new class at my high school. It is called Innovations Class and falls under our state board’s classification of Applied Communications. Thanks to Don Wettrick, I have a plan and a passion for creating this new learning experience for my students.

Here is how it works:
Students choose a problem that needs to be solved. They decide if they are going to work on that alone or in a group of up to three students. They propose a plan, their timeline, the point value of the project, and at least three CCSS English standards that they will master through this project.

Here is the basic class structure:

  • Brainstorming sessions every Monday – but not just the average ones, more directed and unique ways of brainstorming that come from inGenius: A Crash Course in Creativity by Tina Seelig and Creative Confidence: Unleashing the Creative Potential Within Us All by Tom Kelly and David Kelly.
  • Working on projects Tuesday through Thursday – students choose a mentor (that isn’t the teacher) and meet or talk with that person for guidance. Students research their topic, carry out their plans, and build their proposals and presentations, and basically get the job done.
  • Blog/Vlog on Friday – reflecting on how their project is going, their struggles and successes, etc. This is a key to the innovation process.

When the project is finished, the students:
Present their project to their chosen stakeholders.
Argue for their grade and what they believe they have earned.
Choose another project to begin, create a proposal, and start innovating and creating.

One of the biggest parts of this is that we are preparing students for success in the real world. It should never be possible to hear someone question whether or not they will use this in real life. The mentor aspect opens the doors to students who would not normally meet someone in our community, state, or world with connections. Now our students will have someone that they know in the world, and that might become valuable down the road. Might? Okay, it will be.

How do you grade it?
Students determine their approximate point value for the project in their proposal. When they are finished, they will assess themselves and support their case. Talk about students being advocates for themselves! Blogs or Vlogs that are done on a weekly basis will be assessed for reflection.

“When you treat yourself like a professional, other people will do the same.” – Don Wettrick

This class is all about students becoming professionals, and I’m excited to be a part of it.

Motivation

21 Jul

As an English teacher, basketball coach, and golf coach, I spend a good deal of time thinking and learning about motivation. What will get my kids to try their best, work hard, and care about individual growth as well as the improvement of the group. Drive: The Surprising Truth About What Motivates Us by Daniel Pink offers a great look into how motivation has changed from a rewards-based system to a need for intrinsic motivation.

I like to take notes of page numbers and quotes that stand out to me, and I found more than usual to take note of while reading this one. Here’s a little glimpse into my summer front-porch reading.

IMG_1303 IMG_1304

The basic idea is that rewarding someone for doing an activity, that activity becomes work. We “lose intrinsic interest for the activity” (8). In order to motivate people in creative and intellectual tasks, they need to be engaged and motivated from within. The rewards/punishment system of motivation “rests on the belief that work is not inherently enjoyable – which is precisely why we must coax people with external rewards and threaten them with outside punishment” (30). I picture the lack of joy and engagement on some students’ faces, and this is exactly why.

So what do we need to do instead?

“Humans have an innate inner drive to be autonomous, self-determined, and connected to one another. And when this drive is liberated, people achieve more and live richer lives” (73). Think about how so many classrooms and schools are run with a philosophy exactly opposite of this. We limit autonomy, we reward students with grades and more, and we often fear connectivity. It is no wonder we see students bored in class and just doing enough to get by. That is what our system of rewards teaches them to do! We have narrowed down our standards to encourage mastery, but “only engagement can produce mastery” (111). It is time to reengage our students in meaningful work that helps them connect to the world in their own way.

“First, consider nontangible rewards. Praise and positive feedback are much less corrosive than cash and trophies.” This will help to increase intrinsic motivation. “Second, provide useful information” (67). Give positive comments and provide specific feedback to our students.

And now for the hardest hitter of all. “We’re bribing students into compliance instead of challenging them into engagement” (174). Let that sink in a second. Instead of offering students appropriate challenges that stretch an individual’s thinking, we are rewarding students for doing just enough.

We need to help our students to answer the questions that they all want to know: “Why am I learning this? How is it relevant to the world I live in now?” (179).

Helping my students reach an authentic audience with their writing is one way that I am making a change. Writing pieces are not just for me, but for the world. Videos are to be published after a script is crafted. Presentations are to be presented to an audience, and recorded to be shared to the world. That is where we see kids make connections and find passions. Where kids see a need in the world and do something to fill that void.

That is motivation.

Why blog?

21 Jan

In order to prepare for a short class on blogging, I decided to get some of my ideas together and make a post about it! Because I am asking my students to blog, I feel like creating my own was an important step. Here are some of the many benefits that both of us have experienced:

Positive digital citizenship – I really like the idea of building something positive for students on the Internet. We can preach rules about digital citizenship, but we also have to help students put those into practice. To do this in my classroom, we learn about commenting properly as well as taking steps to regulate comments on our own blogs. This also provides a segway into the issues that we see in email, Facebook, and Twitter if we want delve into conduct on these forms of social media.

Authenticity – As an English teacher, I want my students to consider the audience that they are writing for. All too often this is just imagining that it is someone other than me. By creating individual blogs, students are provided with an authentic audience that they attempt to please in order to grow their readership.

Pride – Publishing work on the Internet and gaining followers helps students to feel proud of accomplishing something. I’ve seen students carefully scour their writing for editing mistakes in ways that I could never have dreamed of before blogging. This is their chance to be seen as intelligent citizens of the world, and many of them will take it.

Connecting to others – This is a part of the blogging process that I need to continue to work at. I want my students to find other bloggers with similar interests and make connections across the world. It is possible to connect my classroom with another. I want my students to be reading various blogs, following them, and making connections by being responsible citizens of the internet.

Developing technology skills – Creating a blog or website is a skill that is becoming more common. Students can use this opportunity to familiarize themselves with a more creative aspect of the web than social media sites. These skills can benefit students in the future in presentations, portfolios, and other personal promotions.

Reflection – One of my favorite thoughts that I pass on to my students is that you don’t know what you think until you start to write. We have been reading various articles from Kelly Gallagher’s Article of the Week, and blogs have been a great place to respond to events taking place in the world.

Providing students with a voice – We are also able to use our blogs to provide a voice for students about topics that are of interest to them. I have students writing about fishing adventures and advice, video games (which are a few of the most informed and dedicated bloggers), the life of a military kid, and many other topics.

Blogging has been a great step in my classroom. How can you picture it working in yours?

Communicating with parents about blogs

19 Sep

Involving students in parent communications has always seemed like a great idea to me. The actual practice hasn’t ever taken place in my classroom, but there is no time like the present!

We are beginning a blogging project in 8th grade English and parent permissions and notifications are important. I don’t want anything to come as a surprise to parents, so I want their opinions about privacy to be heard.

I found a letter written by Clay Burrell’s Blogging Parent Letter: Choose Your Privacy Levels. After telling my students that yes, I am a thief and will steal other teachers’ work off of the Internet, we began to change the letter to make it our own.  Our finished product changed the introduction and explanation of what the blogs will do for students in terms of education, but we kept the options and pros and cons the same.  Here is our letter to parents.

What I liked about this letter is that it offers options along with pros and cons.  I still am unsure about whether having a student’s name on his or her blog is a good idea, but now that the parents will be deciding, it is one less thing for me to worry about.

It was amazing to watch the students engage with the wording that they were creating to bring home to their parents. I was actually slightly worried that the students weren’t excited enough about blogging, but I felt much better after hearing them discuss their future blogs.

The keyword in our class has been “passion” about our topics.  By offering a chance for these students to become invested in the project by helping write this letter, I think we are off to a good start!